GALTON BOARD ARTICLES
Why the Normal Distribution has a Bell Curve Shape

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Why the Normal Distribution has a "Bell-Curve" Shape

The normal distribution certainly has a beautiful shape. And in our dataful world, it's everywhere. Heights, weights, neurons firing, the apparent brightness of stars... they all mysteriously fall into line on the "bell curve".

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The Evolution of Normal Distribution

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The Evolution of Normal Distribution

Statistics is the most widely applied of all mathematical disciplines and at the center of statistics lies the normal distribution, known to millions of people as the bell curve, or the bell-shaped curve.

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Simple Explanation of the Central Limit Theorem

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Simple Explanation of the Central Limit Theorem

The central limit theorem (CLT) says that for sufficiently large random samples, the sample means will be approximately normally distributed.

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A Galton Board Demonstration

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A Galton Board Demonstration of Why All Statistical Models are Misspecified

The Galton board or quincunx is a fascinating device that provides a compelling demonstration of one the main laws of statistics.

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The Kids Should See This

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The Kids Should See This

Math in Motion: Playing with a desktop Galton Board

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Tools & Toys

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Tools & Toys

The Galton Board — A Desktop Probability Machine.

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Learning Statistics Through Guided Block Play: A Precurriculum in Statitical Literacy

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Learning Statistics Through Guided Block Play: A Precurriculum in Statitical Literacy

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Galton Board model simulations

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Results of Simulations of a Model of the Galton Board for Various Degrees of Elasticity of the Ball-to-Nail Collision

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Bean Machine: A Declarative Probabilistic Programming Language For Efficient Programmable Inference

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Bean Machine: A Declarative Probabilistic Programming Language For Efficient Programmable Inference

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Introducing Bean Machine

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Introducing Bean Machine

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What If God Were A Giant Game Of Plinko?

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What If God Were A Giant Game Of Plinko?

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DE MOIVRE ON THE LAW OF NORMAL PROBABILITY

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DE MOIVRE ON THE LAW OF NORMAL PROBABILITY

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Engraved Portraits of Gauss for sale by Acme Klein Bottle!

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Engraved Portraits of Gauss for sale by Acme Klein Bottle!

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APSU statistics instructor Sam Ligo builds Real-World models to help Students grasp Math Concepts

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APSU statistics instructor Sam Ligo builds Real-World models to help Students grasp Math Concepts

Austin Peay State University statistics instructor Sam Ligo for years has used his woodworking skills and engineering know-how to build mathematical models – real-world 3D representations of the math – to help his students learn.

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Fine Art Maths Centre - The Quincunx

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Fine Art Maths Centre - The Quincunx

The word “quincunx” refers to a pattern of four objects arranged in a square with a fifth in the centre, like the spots on a dice.

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3D Printed Galton Board

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3D Printed Galton Board

A Galton board (AKA a bean machine) demonstrates probability by allowing balls to drop through an array of pegs through which they have a 50/50 chance of going left or right at each point.

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Deborah R. Fowler - Galton Board

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Deborah R. Fowler - Galton Board

The idea of a Galton board is to demonstrate the bell curve. Dropping balls on pegs arranged in a way such that when the ball is dropped it has a 50/50 chance of going left or right. Generally speaking there are more paths going toward the middle and thus produces the bell curve, or binomial distribution, or normal distribution of balls in the slots below the pegs.

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Galton Board / Quincunx

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Galton Board / Quincunx

The Galton board (also called a Quincunx) is a physical model of the binomial distribution which beautifully illustrates the central limit theorem.

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Random Walk in Stock Market Prices

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Random Walk in Stock Market Prices

FOR MANY YEARS economists, statisticians, and teachers of finance have been interested in developing and testing models of stock price behavior. One important model that has evolved from this research is the theory of random walks.

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Introduction to the Normal Distribution (Bell Curve)

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Introduction to the Normal Distribution (Bell Curve)

The normal distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is symmetrical on both sides of the mean, so the right side of the center is a mirror image of the left side.

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Bean Machine and The Central Limit Theorem

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Bean Machine and The Central Limit Theorem

While I was studying Statistical Physics at the university, I was fascinated by the ability of statistics to simplify and explain the chaotic processes in a smart approach.

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Normal Distribution in Statistics

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Normal Distribution in Statistics

The normal distribution is the most important probability distribution in statistics because it fits many natural phenomena.

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Dice for Statistical Experiments

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Dice for Statistical Experiments

Every statistician wants now and then to test the practical value of some theoretical process...

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Bagatelle as the inspiration for Galton’s Quincunx

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Bagatelle as the inspiration for Galton’s Quincunx

This paper considers the question of how Francis Galton came to devise the quincunx, a pin-board that simulates the effect of a large number of Bernoulli trials to yield an empirical normal curve.

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